Canadian Historical Review

Canadian Historical Review

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This Journal is online at: CHR Online and Project MUSE
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Description
Editorial Board
For Authors and Reviewers
For Readers
New & Noteworthy
Abstracting and Indexing
Advertising
Permissions
Feedback
Acknowledgments
Best Paper Prize
Supplementary Material
Call for Papers
Complete Online Archive Available
Theme Issues
Among the western nations that have played a substantive role in the making of twentieth-century history, Canada enjoys the questionable distinction of being perhaps the least known. Yet there are good reasons for everyone - Canadians included - to know more about Canada's history. Good reasons that are apparent to regular readers of the Canadian Historical Review. The CHR offers an analysis of the ideas, people, and events that have molded Canadian society and its institutions into their present state. Canada's past is examined from a vast and multicultural perspective to provide a thorough assessment of all influences. As a source for authoritative scholarship, giving the sort of in-depth background necessary for understanding the course of daily events - both for Canadians themselves and for others with an interest in the nation's affairs - the CHR is without rival. The Canadian Historical Review provides comprehensive reviews of books to interest all levels of Canadian historians. Each issue also offers an extensive bibliography of recently published historical writings (including CD and video media) in all areas of Canadian history, conveniently arranged by subject.

Published quarterly
in March, June, September, and December .

ISSN: 0008-3755
E-ISSN: 1710-1093
CHR Editors

Suzanne Morton has taught in the area of 20th-century Canadian social and gender history at McGill since 1992. She is especially interested in the intersection of values and society with individuals, the state, and place. These interests were pursued in Ideal Surrounding: Gender in a Working-Class Neighbourhood in the 1920s (1995) and At Odds: Gambling and Canadians, 1919-1969 (2003). They are also central to her forthcoming biography “Wisdom, Charity and Justice: Canadian Social Welfare through the life of Jane B Wisdom, 1884-1975,”(University of Toronto Press) her my current SSHRC-support project “From National Industry to Traditional Fishery: The Lobster Fishery in the Northeast.” The most recent work combines the traditions of political economy and social ecology. With Janet Guildford, she co-edited two collections that focus on women in the Atlantic region - Separate Spheres: Women’s Worlds in the 19th-Century Martimes (1994, 1997, 2006) and Making Up the State: Women in 20th-Century Atlantic Canada (2010). In addition to teaching and research, she served as department Chair (1999-2002) and Associate Dean (Faculty of Arts, 2009-11), and is presently a member of Canada Post’s Stamp Advisory Committee.

Jeffrey L. McNairn is Associate Professor at Queen’s University, where he teaches nineteenth-century Canadian history. He is particularly interested in state-civil society relations, the public sphere and print culture, British imperialism and the creation of neo-British settler societies, and the history of liberalism. His publications include The Capacity to Judge: Public Opinion and Deliberative Democracy in Upper Canada, 1791-1854 (University of Toronto Press, 2000) and a number of articles in intellectual history and the economic thought of British travelers to the Maritime colonies. He is currently working on the history of taxation in Upper Canada and a book project entitled "Insolvent, Imprisoned, Bankrupt: Failure and the Law in Common-Law British North America 1752-1869." He was a member of the CHR’s editorial board from 2008 to 2011.

Editorial Address
The Editors, The Canadian Historical Review
c/o University of Toronto Press Inc.
5201 Dufferin Street
Toronto, Ontario, Canada M3H 5T8
email:chr@utpress.utoronto.ca

Editorial Contact:
Tom Pettitt
Editorial Assistant / Adjoint à la rédaction
University of Toronto Press Journals Division
5201 Dufferin St.
Toronto ON M3H 5T8
tpettitt@utpress.utoronto.ca
(416) 667-7777 ext 7994
Fax/Télécirc. (416) 667-7881

CHR Editorial Board

Liza Piper
University of Alberta

Paige Raibmon
University of British Columbia

Dimitry Anastakis
Trent University

Magda Fahrni
Université de Québec à Montréal

Heidi MacDonald
University of Lethbridge

Anne Marie Corrigan
Journals Division, University of Toronto Press

Steven Maynard - Book Review Editor
Queen's University

CHR Advisory Board

Peter Baskerville, University of Alberta
Margaret Conrad, University of New Brunswick
Michèle Dagenais, Université du Montreal
Marlene Epp, University of Waterloo
Philip Girard, Dalhousie University
Rhonda Hinther, Canadian Museum of Civilization
Ollivier Hubert, Université du Montreal
Christine Hudon, Université de Sherbrooke
Alan MacEachern, University of Western Ontario
Mary Jane Logan McCallum, University of Winnipeg
Lianne McTavish, University of Alberta
Sarah-Jane (Saje) Mathieu, University of Minnesota
Lynne Marks, University of Victoria
Marcel Martel, York University
J.R. (Jim) Miller, University of Saskatchewan
Galen Rogers Perras, University of Ottawa
Joan Sangster, Trent Unversity
Elizabeth Vibert, University of Victoria
Robert Wardhaugh, University of Western Ontario
Catharine Wilson, University of Guelph

All Canadian Historical Review submissions, reviews, and editorial work is done through our online peer review management system PRESTO.

At this time, we would ask that you please contribute content to the journal online.

1. To do so, simply visit the link below and press "click here to register."
2. You will be asked to fill in a contributor form and you must click the "submit" button at the bottom for the page to save your data.

3. You will then be able to log in, using the username and password you just created, and view the contributor homepage, which is the starting point for all functions available to you as a contributor.

http://chr.presto.utpjournals.com/jmanager/users/login

We hope you enjoy your experience with PRESTO!

Submission Guidelines

Peer Review Guidelines

Book Review Guidelines

For assistance with your electronic submission to the journal, please contact Tom Pettitt, Editorial Assistant / Adjointe à la rédaction at tpettitt@utpress.utoronto.ca

Contributors/Authors Survey
Contributors are key to our journals’ success. If you are/have been a contributor to CHR and would like to tell us about your experience, please complete our contributor survey. Thank you! We value and appreciate your input.

Access the full CHR Online Archive

CHR’s full collection of current and past articles are available at CHR Online. This comprehensive archive of Canadian history is fully searchable and includes thousands of articles, reviews, and commentaries written by some of Canada's most influential historians. With works dating back to 1897, CHR Online is an incredible resource that addresses the research needs of today's historians, professors, and students worldwide. Anyone with an interest in Canadian history will appreciate the quality and breadth of this collection. Thousands of articles, reviews, and commentaries await you at CHR Online and The Review of Historical Publications Relating to Canada Online.

Subscribers to CHR Online enjoy:
Early access to the latest issues - Did you know that most online issues are available to subscribers up to two weeks in advance of the print version? Sign up for e-mail alerts and you will know as soon as the latest issue is ready for you to read.

 

Everything you need at your fingertips - search through current and archived issues from the comfort of your office chair instead of by digging through book shelves or storage boxes. The easy- to-use search function allows you to organize results by article summaries, abstracts or citations. You can also bookmark, forward reference link through DOI or CrossRef, export, and print a specific page, chapter or article.

 

Enhanced features not available in the print version - supplementary information, colour photos, videos, audio files, etc. encourage further exploration and research.


Project MUSE
The Canadian Historical Review is part of Project MUSE, a unique collaboration between libraries and publishers that provides full-text, affordable, and user-friendly online access to more than 300 high-quality humanities, arts, and social sciences journals from various scholarly publishers.

Commemorative Bibliography of WWI Scholarship *OPEN ACCESS*.
Canadian Historical Review is pleased to present this collection of WWI scholarship, collected from the archives of this well respected scholarly journal. All articles listed in the bibliography are open access and free to read
http://bit.ly/WW1chr

Canadian Historical Review - A Life in History/La vie d’historien

In December 2011, CHR launched a new series. ‘A Life in History’ features prominent members of the historical profession in Canada who have recently retired and invites them to reflect upon their very distinguished careers. Among other things, they have been asked to look back and consider what led them to become historians. They will also discuss the changes and continuities they have witnessed over the years in their respective fields and offer readers their assessment of the present ‘state of things.’ This new series is a regular feature of CHR and is of interest to a wide group of readers and leads to a creative and stimulating dialogue about the practice of Canadian history, both within and outside of the academy.

Articles in this informative new series have included

A History Teacher Looks Back by Ken Osborne
A Life between Geography and History by Cole Harris
Continuing Education: My Life as a Historian by C.J. Taylor
Defining Identities in Canada: Regional, Imperial, National By Phil Buckner
Histoire quand tu nous tiens by Jean-Claude Robert
Insérer les femmes dans l'histoire : le parcours d'une vie by Micheline Dumont
Is History Another Word for Experience? Morton's Confessions by Desmond Morton
It Was All about Me: Making History Relevant by Margaret Conrad
No One Becomes a Feminist to Be Appreciated by Wendy Mitchinson
Winding Trails: My Life in History by Alison Prentice
Workers and Soldiers: Adventures in History by Terry Copp

Contact for Advertising information:
Audrey Greenwood
Advertising and Marketing Coordinator
University of Toronto Press
5201 Dufferin Street
Toronto, Ontario Canada M3H 5T8
Tel: (416) 667–7766 Fax: (416) 667–7881
Email:
agreenwood@utpress.utoronto.ca
Permissions Inquiries
University of Toronto Press
5201 Dufferin Street
Toronto, ON M3H 5T8 Canada
Tel: (416) 667–7777 ext:7849 Fax: (416) 667–7881
Email: journal.permissions@utpress.utoronto.ca
Yesterday I took the train from Toronto to Ottawa and read the Dec 2010 issue of the CHR from cover to cover. I had to write and tell you how fantastic it was. The combination of the very focused first three pieces with the wide scope of the two review essays was perfect, but each article on its own I found very well written, engaging, insightful, and thought-provoking. And the book reviews were the icing on the cake. The only way the issue could have been more appealing is if some of the writing had been in French, but of course you have no control over that. It is a pleasure to have such incontrovertible evidence that Canadian history is thriving. Keep up the good work. - Philip Girard, CHR Subscriber

Comments/Questions?
Do you have comments or questions about any of our journals? We would love to hear from you.
Tell us what you think – write, email or call us at:

University of Toronto Press — Journals Division
5201 Dufferin Street
Toronto, ON M3H 5T8 Canada
tel: (416) 667-7810 fax: (416) 667-7881
email: journals@utpress.utoronto.ca


The CHR is published with the support of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)


CHR Prize
2013 – Sean Mills “Quebec, Haiti, and the Deportation Crisis of 1974

Previous prize winners include:

2012 - Jarret Rudy’s “Do You Have the Time? Modernity, Democracy, and the Beginnings of Daylight Saving Time in Montreal, 1907–1928
2011
—- Tina Loo and Meg Stanley "An Environmental History of Progress: Damning the Peace and Columbia Rivers"
2010
—- Mark Osborne Humphries "War's Long Shadow: Masculinity, Medicine, and the Gendered Politics of Trauma, 1914-1939"
2009
—- Mary Ellen Kelm "Manly Contests: Rodeo Masculinities at the Calgary Stampede"
2008
—- Bruce Curtis "The Most Splendid Pageant Ever Seen: Grandeur, the Domestic, and Condescension in Lord Durham's Political Theatre"
2007
—- Sean Kheraj, "Restoring Nature: Ecology, Memory, and the Storm History of Vancouver's Stanley Park"
2006
—- Lianne McTavish, "Learning to See in New Brunswick, 1862-1929"
2005
—- Graham Carr, "Rules of Engagement: Public History and the Drama of Legitimation"
2004
—- John F. Varty, "On Protein, Prairie Wheat, and Good Bread: Rationalizing Technologies and the Canadian State, 1912-1935"
2003
—- Karen Jones, "Never Cry Wolf: Science, Sentiment, and the Literary Rehabilitation of Canis Lupus"
2002
—- Carolyn Podruchny, "Baptizing Novices: Ritual Moments among French Canadian Voyageurs in the Montreal Fur Trade, 1780-1821"
2001
—- Catharine Anne Wilson, "Reciprocal Work Bees and the Meaning of Neighbourhood"

Les Presses de l’Université de Toronto  ont le plaisir de remettre le Prix de la Canadian Historical Review pour l’année 2011 à Tina Loo et Meg Stanley pour leur article, An Environmental History of Progress: Damming the Peace and Columbia Rivers”,, apparaissant dans le numéro 92.3, et sélectionné par le Conseil éditoriale de la CHR comme le meilleur article paru dans le volume 92 de la revue.

The Contested Past: Reading Canada's History - Selections from the Canadian Historical Review
Edited by Marlene Shore
University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division

This collection of selected excerpts focuses on The Canadian Historical Review's contribution to the study of Canadian history from the journal's founding in 1920 to the present. Using the CHR's own interconnected objectives as a benchmark - the promotion of high standards of historical research and writing in Canada, and the fostering of the study of Canadian history - Marlene Shore analyses the varying degrees of success the journals had in meeting its those goals. Her introductory essay shows how the CHR was shaped not only by its own editorial policies, but by international currents affecting the discipline of history and its practitioners.
Call for Papers
The Canadian Historical Review, Canada’s pre-eminent journal of Canadian history, is dedicated to publishing original scholarship of the highest scholarly standards in French and English. CHR articles are cited more than those published in any other Canadian history journal and in 2013, CHR articles were downloaded over 99,000 times. Both the CHR editors and editorial board welcome academics at any stage of their career, from Canada and beyond, to explore any aspect or period of Canadian history. We invite a broad range of topics, perspectives, and interpretive frameworks, and encourage imagination and innovation along with the more traditional approaches used in historical research and writing. Comparative and transnational approaches to understanding Canada’s past are also welcome.

The Canadian Historical Review publishes standard, full-length articles based on primary research as well as “Forum” pieces that can be more experimental, historiographic in their approach, and shorter. The editors also welcome suggestions for alternative formats, especially those that promote scholarly exchange and debate. Articles accepted for publication typically appear in the CHR thirteen to eighteen months after submission.

Articles published in CHR will automatically be considered for the journal’s annual ‘Best Article’ prize.

Canadian Historical Review’s complete collection of current and past articles is available at CHR Online, including works dating back to 1897 when CHR (launched in 1920) was The Review of Historical Publications Relating to Canada. CHR Online (bit.ly/chronline) addresses the research needs of today's historians, professors, and students. CHR is also available online through Project MUSE(bit.ly/ChrPM).

Visit the "For Authors and Reviews tab" for more information regarding submissions to CHR, including guidelines for submission.

Submission Guidelines

Peer Review Guidelines

Book Review Guidelines

The Canadian Historical Review is the oldest, and most prestigious,  peer reviewed history journal in Canada. The first issue of the CHR was published in 1920 but it had originated from an earlier publication Review of Historical Publications Relating to Canada, which launched in 1897. Along with book and online resource reviews, the CHR publishes a variety of articles relating to Canadian history on a quarterly basis. Throughout the years, the CHR has published every historian of note in Canada.

Anyone with an interest in Canadian history will appreciate the quality and breadth of this collection. Thousands of articles, reviews, and commentaries await you at CHR Online and The Review of Historical Publications Relating to Canada Online.The entire online archive is available for $6,500. Libraries retain perpetual access to the archive of this journal once purchased. If the library maintains a current subscription, there is no further fee. Otherwise, there is an annual fee of $50 to maintain the site. Discounts for multiple purchases and consortia are available.

If you would like to request an invoice, or purchase this online archive with your Visa or Mastercard, please contact us directly via phone at (416) 667-7810 or email.
Canadian subscribers pay in Canadian dollars and will be charged HST; all other subscribers pay in USD.

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